How to make your baby’s Halloween memorable and candy-free

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It’s October, which means that Halloween is coming up! If there’s any holiday associated with candy and all those sugary treats that your baby isn’t allowed to eat yet, it’s Halloween.

But even if your baby isn’t old enough to stand (much less go around the neighborhood trick-or-treating), there are still things you can do to celebrate the holiday and enjoy yourselves! Starting with…

  1. Dress Baby in a costume. Probably the most obvious, and the one parents are most eager to do, is to dress Baby in a cute costume! Luckily, costumes of all kinds can be found at stores, or you can make one of your own. We dressed our son as a Totoro last year – I took the lazy approach and sewed ears on a white hat, then dressed him in a white hoodie and white sweat pants.
  2. Visit a pumpkin patch. If your baby or toddler is already walking, they will be fascinated by the pumpkins and their vibrant orange colors! Ours ran around pointing at the pumpkins and making fascinated sounds of approval. Even if Baby isn’t walking, it’s a great excuse to get them out into the fresh air! They will be fascinated by the pumpkins, and it will be a great experience for them. Every new experience helps develop Baby’s brain, after all! (Rad Dad tip: dress Baby in orange for color-coordinated photos!)
  3. Create a Halloween keepsake. There’s more to Halloween than just candy, as we’ve already established! So make your little one’s first, second, or third Halloween memorable by creating a keepsake. We’ve included a pumpkin keepsake kit for our subscribers in our October Rad Dad Box (and will include a photo tutorial soon), but check out this article from Parents Magazine for more Halloween craft ideas for toddlers. It’s also a great way for dad, mom, and Baby to have fun together!
  4. Decorate a pumpkin. You may not want to wield a carving knife in front of your baby or toddler, but there are lots of ways to decorate a pumpkin without sharp objects. Buy some baby-safe paints and paint a face on the pumpkin. Make a teal pumpkin. You get the idea!
  5. Tell ghost stories with a flashlight. If you haven’t done it yet, flip off all the lights in your house at night. Then light up the flashlight. Your baby will love it! There’s just something about babies and lights… Tell ghost stories, Great Pumpkin stories, or other Halloween-themed stories and, if your baby is old enough, give them the flashlight to play with. They’ll enjoy it!
  6. Bake sugar-free Halloween cookies. If you’re a baking dad (or mom), you can find recipes here and here.
  7. If they are old enough, enlist their help in handing treats to trick-or-treaters. Most babies love interacting with older children, even if they don’t quite grasp the concept of play yet. It’s also a good social exercise for the baby. Answer the door with your cute costumed baby in your arms, and have baby hand out candy (or other treats) to the kids at the door!
  8. Take them trick-or-treating, but don’t let them eat the candy. This will be fun for both babies and toddlers! If your baby is younger than one, you can probably get away with this without inciting any tantrums. If Baby is older than one (that is, if Baby is a toddler), they may realize that candy is food and want some for themselves. Try to encourage them to play with the candy, but not eat it. Put the candy in a bowl, for example, then take it out. Use the candy to help them learn how to count. Then hide it away and give it away at your office (or eat it yourself :D). Yes, I know we’re sounding like those adults who gave out apples to trick-or-treaters when we were kids (and whom we all probably hated), but it’s for baby’s own good!

What are your plans for a sugar- and candy-free Halloween? Please share in the comments!

 

More great Dad-themed children’s books

I know it hasn’t been that long since our last post about Dad-themed children’s books, but since then, we took a trip to the library and discovered a whole new treasure trove of Dad-themed children’s books! Many of these were published in the last year, and we couldn’t not share these with you! So, in no particular order, here they are:

it's great being a dad1. It’s Great Being a Dad by Dan Bar-el, illustrated by Gina Perry.  This book is part of the wave of Dad children’s books that was published earlier this year, and it’s a fun book! It starts out in a magical land of Loch Ness monsters, unicorns, and robots, but when they run into trouble, Dad is there to save the day! This is a perfect read for Halloween but is great anytime of the year. We also love that this book features diverse characters.

Dads first day2. Dad’s First Day, written and illustrated by Mike Wohnoutka. Another library find! This is a sweet and humorous story about an at-home dad who’s nervous about his son starting school. Although our son is still quite a ways from kindergarten, we are familiar with the feeling of not being ready for certain milestones. More than that, there aren’t enough books about at-home dads (in fact, this is the only one we can think of), so we love that this book fills an underserved niche.

daddy honk honk3. Daddy Honk Honk!, written and illustrated by Rosalind Bonnet. Aput the fox finds an abandoned goose egg and, when it hatches, tries to look for a new home for the little gosling. Little does he know, though, that the little gosling will start to grow on him and win a place in his heart! I love this book because it tackles the subject of adoption, which is another underserved niche. The illustrations are also adorable.

My Daddy Rules the world  4. My Daddy Rules the World, written and illustrated by Hope Anita Smith. In a series of quiet paper-cut illustrations, this book celebrates everyday moments between fathers and their children, from bike-riding to wrestling matches to bedtime snuggles. Each illustration is accompanied by a poem. We love the diverse showcase of fathers in the book as well.

 

Little Wolfs first howling

5. Little Wolf’s First Howling, by Laura McGee Kvasnosky and illustrated by Kate Harvey McGee. This is a fun book for Dads and babies to read together! Little Wolf can’t wait to start howling at the full moon, and he and his dad start practicing their howls. We guarantee that reading this out loud will delight any baby old enough to understand. The illustrations are also beautiful: bold outlines with soft, intricate details.

Daddy long legs

6. Daddy Long Legs, by Nadine Brun-Cosme, illustrated by Aurélie Guillerey.  This book is like an opposite “Runaway Bunny.” Matthew’s dad drops him off at school, but Matthew is worried that something might happen to prevent his dad from coming back to pick him up. He poses one hypothetical after another, with his Dad reassuring him after each question that he will be there, by teddy bear, by dragon, and finally by his own long legs himself!
rory the dinosaur7. Rory the Dinosaur: Me and My Dad, by Liz Climo. A gentler “Runaway Bunny”-type tale, Rory the dinosaur goes on a series of adventures around their island, thinking all the while how excited he will be to tell his dad about them! But although Dad is just one step behind him, he’s rad enough to let Rory think that he’s had a fantastic adventure all by himself!

How dads can be involved during baby’s early days (besides changing diapers)

IMG_1172After coming home from the hospital, some dads may feel left out of family life and struggle to bond with their babies. In fact, a 2009 study found that 40 percent of dads felt that they had nothing to do after the baby was born. However, there are plenty of things new dads can do to foster their bond with Baby, help new moms to recover from labor, and be involved. Changing diapers is a given, of course, but we’ve outlined a few other ways new dads can be involved in their family’s life.

  1. Give the baby a sponge bath.  Parents are advised to give babies sponge baths until the umbilical cord falls off (usually within the first two weeks). Sponge baths are a great way for dads to begin to establish their bond with and feel more attached to baby, while also giving moms a little time to rest and recover. This article from Johnson and Johnson gives you a handy step-by-step guide on how to give sponge baths. From our personal experience, you can never have too many washcloths during this period! (In fact, this is why we include an organic cotton washcloth in our Rad Dad Newborn Starter Kit.) We also want to warn you that this is not always a pleasant task, as many babies seem to hate sponge baths!
  2. Once Baby’s umbilical cord has fallen off, give Baby a regular bath. I will be honest, Mr. Rad Dad bathed our baby until he was 7-8 months old – basically, until he could sit up on his own. I wasn’t strong enough, especially in the early days, to hold the baby under running water and my hands and arms weren’t big enough to support his head and neck *and* bathe him at the same time. Also, if bathing the baby requires you to kneel down, remember that it is very difficult for Mom to bend down when she is still recovering from giving birth. Bathing is a much more pleasant experience than sponge bathing, and it can really help new dads feel more involved and have fun with baby at the same time.
  3. Read to your baby. Did you know that a recent study found that children develop better language skills when Dad reads the bedtime story?  Reading to your baby is encouraged from day one, and it’s also a good bonding experience for Dad and baby. Even if it seems like there are only 30 minutes a day where your baby is awake and not eating, that’s still a little time where you can squeeze in a story! Check out our previous post on a few good dad-themed books to read to your baby, some of which have been included in our past boxes.DSCN7107
  4. Spend some skin-to-skin time with your baby, or just hold them as they are napping. Since newborns sleep almost all the time, one way for Dads to bond with their babies is to have some skin-to-skin time with the baby. The physical contact, the feeling of warm skin, and a beating heart is very soothing for babies. If you don’t like the idea of constantly dressing and undressing yourself and the baby, then simply holding the baby while they sleep works just as well. Trust me, as your baby gets older, they will never fall asleep in your arms the way a newborn does – so take advantage of this and enjoy while you can!DSCN7050
  5. Help baby with tummy-time. Tummy time is a great opportunity for dads to be involved from early on, especially as parents nowadays are encouraged to start tummy time as soon as they come home from the hospital. Tummy time is the practice of placing the baby on his/her tummy and practice lifting their head and exercising their neck, shoulders, body, and their eye muscles. Moms are encouraged to lie down and place the baby on her stomach or chest as early tummy time practice, but we would actually encourage Dads to do this as well. Doctors suggest starting off with 3-5 minute sessions, 2-3 times a day, although from our personal experience, we did this once a day during the first two weeks of our baby’s life, and usually stopped when he started crying. Read more about tummy time on WebMD here.
  6. Give baby a massage. Baby massage is not only a great way to bond with the baby, but researchers have found that it also promotes better sleep and relieves colic. Parents.com provides a good step-by-step guide on how to massage your baby.
  7. Rattles and Baby Paper are your best friends. Newborns aren’t very interested in most toys, but if you want to try to play with your newborn, they do react to toys that make sound. We recommend rattles, as they are also good for development and have a long shelf-life as toys, as well as Baby Paper, which is crinkle paper sewn into fabric. Babies LOVE crinkle paper. And make sure to have a camera handy to capture your baby’s first reaction to the rattle!
  8. Be involved with breastfeeding, especially if your partner is struggling to breastfeed the baby. Contrary to popular belief, there ARE ways that men can help with breastfeeding. If your partner is having trouble breastfeeding, you can sit with her while she’s breastfeeding, help her position the baby, check on latch, and you can attend sessions with the lactation consultant and read up on breastfeeding so you are well-informed to help in this aspect. If your baby is nursing like a champ, there are still ways you can be involved: washing the pump parts, bringing your partner water while she’s nursing, and making sure the remote and phone are nearby.
  9. Bottle-feed the baby. If you and your partner aren’t averse to it, bottle-feeding the baby pumped milk or formula is a very nice way for dads to bond with the baby – while also giving Mom a break! Nowadays, medical professionals recommend waiting four weeks before introducing a bottle to prevent nipple confusion, but do what you think is best for your baby. If your baby is having trouble latching at the breast or your partner’s milk supply is still coming in, it doesn’t hurt to supplement with pumped milk or formula in a bottle. Fed is best, after all!DSCN9485
  10. Take the baby out for walks. This can be done with or without your partner, but taking the baby out for a walk is a great way for Dad to spend time alone with the baby or for the entire family to get out of the house for a little bit and spend time together. Each new experience helps develop the baby’s brain, and you will be fascinated by how your newborn baby observes leaves, trees, houses, and takes in everything around them.
  11. Cook. If you don’t have any family members helping you out, cooking is one thing you can do to allow your partner more time to recover. Your partner is probably exhausted from giving birth, breastfeeding, pumping, and waking up at all hours (especially if she’s decided to exclusively breastfeed), so why not take one thing off her to-do list and do the cooking? Think about it this way: by making sure your partner has enough to eat, you are also ensuring that your baby will eat well! If you can’t or don’t want to cook, no judgment! There are also frozen meal and delivery options. Taking care of the food area, whether through cooking yourself or ordering out, makes one less thing for your partner to worry about. Less stress for your partner = faster recovery!
  12. Clean and do other chores. Speaking from personal experience and the experiences of other moms we spoke to, cleaning, sweeping the floor, washing dishes, doing laundry, shopping for groceries and other household tasks are all things that Dads can do in the early days that allow their partners time to rest and recover from giving birth.
  13. Take care of yourself. Last of all, it’s important to practice self-care during this time. You will be tired from shouldering many of the household tasks and taking care of a newborn baby during this time, and possibly working full-time as well, so make sure you get a little rest and time to yourself, too.

So, Dads, we hope that this list will give you an idea of how you can be involved, how you can help your partner recover, and how you can bond with baby after you and your partner bring your little one home from the hospital! Experienced moms and dads, do you have any other suggestions? Leave them in the comments!

7 Great Dad-themed books for children

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Parents nowadays are strongly encouraged to read to their children, starting from birth. It is also a great way for Dads to bond with their babies. Recent studies even suggest that kids develop better language skills when Dad reads to them. For these reasons and more, we’ve been including Dad-themed books in our boxes. If you are looking for Dad-themed books in your child’s library collection, please read below to see our picks.

Daddy cuddles book

 

  1. Daddy Cuddles (author Anne Gutman, illustrator Georg Hallensleben). Hallensleben’s soft, pastel-like illustrations were what attracted me to this board book. Each page features a dad-and-baby pair from different animal species and how each dad hugs and cuddles with his baby. We included this book in our July “Animal Kingdom” box.

 

My Dad Loves me book2.  My Dad Loves Me! (author and illustrator Marianne Richmond). Similar to Daddy Cuddles, this board book goes through different father-child animal pairs and talks about how each Dad animal cares for his child. I also love the illustrations, especially of the polar bears and the penguins. (Note: astute readers may notice the similarities between the penguins in this book and our logo, but I sketched our logo based on observations of penguins in the wild.) This book was included in our February “Beat the Winter Blues” box.

papa please get the moon

 

3. Papa, please get the moon for me (author and illustrator Eric Carle). Eric Carle of “Very Hungry Caterpillar” fame has also written and illustrated a sweet book about the father-daughter relationship! Monica wants the moon to play with, so her father builds a ladder to reach it – only to find that it’s too heavy! Available in board book and picture book formats.

 

 

Because I'm Your Dad

4. Because I’m Your Dad (author Ahmet Zappa, illustrator Dan Santat). The fun-loving Daddy monster in this board book would let his child have spaghetti for breakfast, French toast for dinner, and rocky road ice cream in the tub! This book is a fun tribute to Dads.

 

Papasaurus

5. Papasaurus (author and illustrator Stephan Lomp). A companion to “Mamasaurus”! Babysaurus loves playing hide-and-seek with Papasaurus, but when it’s Papasaurus’ turn to hide, Babysaurus can’t find him! This picture book is also great for older babies and toddlers who have graduated from board books. We are also huge fans of the illustrations. Look for this book in a future Rad Dad Box!

 

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6. You and Me, Me and You (author and illustrator Miguel Tanco). This book takes us through a father and son’s day in the city, during which they discuss life, and bond with each other. We also love Tanco’s retro-style illustrations. This is also a good book for toddlers and older children.

 

 

my dad used to be so cool

7. My Dad Used to be so Cool (author and illustrator Keith Negley). All dads have probably felt this way at one time or another! A new dad looks back wistfully on his pre-baby days, when he was in a band, rode motorcycles, and got tattoos, and laments about his lack of coolness. But his baby still thinks he’s totally rad!

 

 

Tributes to dads are important not only in helping men feel more confident as fathers, but also in helping children appreciate their dads. If you need more inspiration, The Guardian also has a list of their favorite Dad-themed children’s books!

What are some of your favorite dad-themed books?